Idea Hamster

Ideas Are Easy: Development Is Hard

221 notes

kimberellasuglystepsister:

Ancient sea creatures filtered food like modern whales

The animals lived 520 million years ago during the Early Cambrian, a period known as the ‘Cambrian Explosion’ in which all the major animal groups and complex ecosystems suddenly appeared. Tamisiocaris belongs to a group of animals called anomalocarids, a type of early arthropod that included the largest and some of the most iconic animals of the Cambrian period. They swam using flaps down either side of the body and had large appendages in front of their mouths that they most likely used to capture larger prey, such as trilobites.However, the newly discovered fossils show that those predators also evolved into suspension feeders, their grasping appendages morphing into a filtering apparatus that could be swept like a net through the water, trapping small crustaceans and other organisms as small as half a millimetre in size.

Read more from the press release. 
The abstract of the scientific paper. 
Read how the Daily Mail butchered this information by labelling it an ancestor of whales. 
And for good measure, the Daily Mail song.

The editors of the Daily Mail should be sharply rapped with ball-peen hammers.
Cool animal, though. Giant sea creatures feeding through adaptable tentacular appendages? I would like to know more.

kimberellasuglystepsister:

Ancient sea creatures filtered food like modern whales

The animals lived 520 million years ago during the Early Cambrian, a period known as the ‘Cambrian Explosion’ in which all the major animal groups and complex ecosystems suddenly appeared. Tamisiocaris belongs to a group of animals called anomalocarids, a type of early arthropod that included the largest and some of the most iconic animals of the Cambrian period. They swam using flaps down either side of the body and had large appendages in front of their mouths that they most likely used to capture larger prey, such as trilobites.

However, the newly discovered fossils show that those predators also evolved into suspension feeders, their grasping appendages morphing into a filtering apparatus that could be swept like a net through the water, trapping small crustaceans and other organisms as small as half a millimetre in size.

Read more from the press release

The abstract of the scientific paper. 

Read how the Daily Mail butchered this information by labelling it an ancestor of whales. 

And for good measure, the Daily Mail song.

The editors of the Daily Mail should be sharply rapped with ball-peen hammers.

Cool animal, though. Giant sea creatures feeding through adaptable tentacular appendages? I would like to know more.

Filed under bad editing kaiju lovecraft

0 notes

Strange series of Japanese commercials for “Boss Rainbow Mountain” or something like that, starring Tommy Lee Jones.

1 note

j0n00:

It’s amazing to think how much things have changed in the last 40 years. Science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke makes an impressively accurate prediction.

I am (just barely) old enough to remember a time without computers in the home. This was bold thinking at the time.

Filed under predictions arthur c. clarke

3 notes

gayscifiguy:

THE APOCALYPSE OF THE INTERNET
By Adam Rothstein

The information networks gravitated back into physical space. There, we still have dark corners, the dead spots where cameras cannot see. In the dark of the bedroom, without a spoken word, a bit of virtual space for ourselves. A swapped disk with some text, a flash drive with a couple of GIFs passed under the table—these are the sewers we crawl through after the streets are paved with policemen. These are the emoticons made from hand signals we flash to each other in the dark.
The cryptography was too difficult for most people, the privacy settings too hard to grok. And so rather than hiding our words on the internet, we simply took them offline again, where they had always been.

Short fiction or prediction? Decide by reading the OMNI Reboot piece here.

gayscifiguy:

THE APOCALYPSE OF THE INTERNET

The information networks gravitated back into physical space. There, we still have dark corners, the dead spots where cameras cannot see. In the dark of the bedroom, without a spoken word, a bit of virtual space for ourselves. A swapped disk with some text, a flash drive with a couple of GIFs passed under the table—these are the sewers we crawl through after the streets are paved with policemen. These are the emoticons made from hand signals we flash to each other in the dark.

The cryptography was too difficult for most people, the privacy settings too hard to grok. And so rather than hiding our words on the internet, we simply took them offline again, where they had always been.

Short fiction or prediction? Decide by reading the OMNI Reboot piece here.

Filed under warning